Learn

Get informed about Canada’s political system—and women’s leadership within it.

Learn

Our History.

Year 1917

Some women get the right to vote in Manitoba

Year 1917

Louise McKinney is the first woman elected in Canada (Alberta MLA)

Year 1918
Year 1918

Some women get the right to vote in federal elections

Year 1919

Some women get the right to run as federal candidate

Year 1919
Year 1921
Year 1921

Agnes Macphail is first woman elected to Parliament

Agnes Macphail
Year 1936

Barbara Hanley is first woman elected as mayor in Canada

Barbara Hanley
Year 1936
Year 1948
Year 1948

The right to vote is extended to Asian women

Year 1950

Inuit women gain the right to vote, although not put into practice in the North until 1962

Year 1950
Year 1951
Year 1951

Charlotte Winton is first woman mayor of a major Canadian city (Ottawa)

Charlotte Winton
Year 1960

The Indian Act is amended to allow First Nations women the right to vote in federal elections

Year 1960
Year 1972
Year 1972

Rosemary Brown is first Black woman elected in Canada (British Columbia MLA)

Rosemary Brown
Year 1980

Jeanne Sauvé is first woman Speaker of the House of Commons

Year 1980
Year 1988
Year 1988

Ethel Blondin-Andrew is first Indigenous woman elected to the Parliament

Year 1989

Audrey McLaughlin is first woman to lead a major federal political party

Year 1989
Year 1991
Year 1991

Rita Johnson is first woman Premier in Canada (British Columbia)

Year 1993

Kim Campbell is Canada’s first (and still only) woman Prime Minister

Kim Campbell
Year 1993
Year 2001
Year 2001

Equal Voice founded

Year 2013

Kathleen Wynne becomes the first openly LGBTQ+ provincial Premier (Ontario)

Kathleen Wynnel
Year 2013
Year 2015

Alberta NDP comes closest governing party to gender parity, with 47 percent of seats held by women

Year 2015

First gender-balanced federal cabinet appointed

Year 2018
Year 2018

Québec is the first jurisdiction to elect more than 40% women (41.5%)

Government

Canada has multiple levels of government: federal, provincial/territorial, municipal and band council. There are also many self government agreements in place with Indigenous communities across the country.

Federal

Led by the Prime Minister, the federal government is responsible for areas of national/international importance, including foreign affairs, national defense, banking and taxes.

Connect with your Member of Parliament here:

Provincial / Territorial

Led by a Premier, provincial and territorial governments manage their lands, and have jurisdiction over areas such as healthcare, education, and road regulations.

Connect with your Member of Provincial Parliament here:

Municipal

Led by a Mayor, municipalities run cities and towns, and are responsible for areas such as local police and fire services, parks, roadways, and libraries.

Connect with your municipal representative here:

Elections.

By law, federal elections always take place on the third Monday of October, the fourth year after the previous election. However, there are times when the federal government may decide to call an election at an earlier date.

Most other election times and laws vary across provinces, territories, and municipalities.

Learn about elections in your area

How can you make a difference?

Vote

Voting is the easiest way to make a difference. Exercise your right to vote. Find out more about voting at www.elections.ca.

Encourage others to vote on election day.

Drive a friend to the polls or lend a helping hand to friends with children to make sure they get out and vote.

Find candidates near you

Volunteer

If there's a campaign going on in your riding, municipality, or province/territory, consider volunteering for a local candidate that you like. Campaigns need people to call potential voters, put up signs and posters, knock on doors, drop off flyers, fundraise, answer phones, attend rallies and election events. Elected officials often need volunteers in their constituency offices as well to help with organizing and attending events as well as answering phones. Just drop in and ask if you can be of assistance.

Find campaigns near you

Nominate

If you are active in your local political party and you know a woman who is smart enough, tough enough and energetic enough to take on the challenge of political office, get her involved and support her nomination AND/OR run yourself.

Learn more about how you or someone you know can run here:

Join us at an event.

Help us make it happen.

To continue to advocate and to organize, we need your help.
Your donation—whatever the size—goes to helping us continue get the message out.

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